Apr 16, 2024  
2020-2021 Academic Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Computer Information Technology

  
  • CITC 1300 Beginning HTML & CSS

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This is a beginning course in HTML that provides instruction in creating Web pages. Students learn to write HTML code. Topics include using HTML tags, CSS formatting, and appropriate scripting languages.

    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 1301 Introduction to Programming and Logic

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is an introduction to the logic necessary for application programming. Topics include logic analysis, techniques of structured design, process flow, and object oriented concepts. A programming language will be used to teach data types, variables, control structures, methods and arrays.

    Prerequisite(s): READ 0810  or equivalent
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 1302 Introduction to Networking

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This is a broad-based course that provides an overview of computer networking. Topics will include network models, protocols and services, media and topologies, devices and tools, network management and network security. This course may align with the outcomes of industry. 

    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 1303 Database Concepts

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is an introduction to the concepts and syntax of relational database management systems. Topics include data modeling, database design concepts, tables and queries and other database objects using the tools provided in a relational DBMS.

    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 1308 Computer Literacy & Applications

    3 Credit Hour(s)


    An introduction to microcomputers and application software used in academic and work settings. Topics include file management, word processing, spreadsheets, presentation software, graphic applications, the use of email, hardware and operating systems. The course provides hands-on experience.

    Learning Outcomes:

    • perform routine operations using an operating system including file and folder management
    • preate and edit files using software for document processing, spreadsheets, graphics, and presentations
    • search and download data from the Internet using a web browser
    • demonstrate the mechanics and etiquette of email


  
  • CITC 1310 Programming I

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course introduces the basic concepts of programming, problem solving, programming logic, and design techniques using an object-oriented language. The topics covered include the language syntax, functions, return types, and objects fount in a current object-oriented programming language.

    Prerequisite(s): CITC 1301  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 1311 Programming II

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    A continuation of CITC 1310 - Programming I. This course introduces the student to object oriented programming. Topics include class creation, methods, events, inheritance, objects and error handling.

    Prerequisite(s): CITC 1310  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 1314 Java Programming I

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course will cover the fundamental concepts of object-orientend programming using Java, including objects, classes, constructors, methods, and instance variables. Students will understand and implement topics such as user-designed classes, arrays and array processing, graphical user interfaces, and applets.

    Prerequisite(s): CITC 1301  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 1315 Java Programming II

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course continues the coverage of the fundamental concepts of Object Oriented Programming. Topics will include Super Classes, Sub Classes, Polymorphism, Inheritance, Stacks, Queues, and Lists. User Designed classes are implemented.

    Prerequisite(s): CITC 1314  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 1320 A+ Hardware & Software

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    Computer Hardware and Software covers installation, maintenance, repair, troubleshooting, and connectivity of computers and networks. Topics include the internal components of a computer, installing an operating system, troubleshooting using system tools and diagnostic software, connecting to a network, implementing security best practices on a workstation, and peripheral setup and troubleshooting. This course intergrates virtual learning tools to supplement classroom learning and to provide an interactive “hands-on” experience. Upon successfully completing this course, the student will be academically prepared for the current CompTIA A+ certification exams in hardware and software.

    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 1321 A+ Hardware

    3 Credit Hour(s)


    This course is an introduction to microcomputer hardware installation, maintenance, repair and troubleshooting. Students will learn the processes and procedures for supporting microcomputer hardware in a business environment.  This course is designed to assist the student in taking the CompTIA A+ hardware certification examination.

    Learning Outcomes:

    • Identify, install, configure, and troubleshoot hardware components to support computing needs.
    • Identify, install, configure, and troubleshoot basic networking hardware to support computing needs.
    • Identify and demonstrate appropriate operational procedures, communication, and professional skills.


    Prerequisite(s): INFS 1010   or equivalent.
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.

  
  • CITC 1322 A+ Software Certification Training

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    An introduction to microcomputer operating system installation, configuration, upgrading, diagnosing and troubleshooting. Students will learn the processes and procedures for supporting microcomputer software in a business environment. This course is designed to assist the student to take the Comp TIA A+ Software certification examination.

    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 1323 CCNA I

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    Introduction to Networks is the first of two courses leading to the Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) designation and is the first of four courses leading to the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA R&S) designation. This course introduces Networking Academy students to the networking field. Topics include Network terminology, Network protocols, Local-area networks (LANs), Wide-area networks (WANs), Open System Interconnection (OSI) model, Cabling, Routers, Internet Protocol (IP) addressing, and Network standards.

    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 1324 CCNA II

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    Routing and Switching Essentials is the second of two courses leading to the Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) designation and is the second of four courses leading to the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA R&S) designation. This course focuses on the following: basic routing and switching concepts, Virtual LANs (VLANs), Inter-VLAN routing, static routing and dynamic routing protocols, Single-Area OSPF, Access Control Lists (ACLs), Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) and Network Address Translation (NAT).

    Prerequisite(s): CITC 1323  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 1330 Microsoft Desktop OS

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    Microsoft Desktop Operating Systems is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to install, manage and troubleshoot computers running current Microsoft desktop operating systems. Upon successfully completing this course, the student will be academically prepared for a current core Microsoft desktop operating exam.

    Prerequisite(s): CITC 1323  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 1332 UNIX/LINUX OS

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course provides a thorough overview of the UNIX and LINUX operating systems. Emphasis is placed on the user interface, terminology and command structure within the multi-task/multiuser environment. Electronic mail and communications standards are covered along with standard UNIX/LINUX utilities needed to support the automated office.

    Prerequisite(s): CITC 1301  and CITC 1323  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 1351 Principles of Info Assurance

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This is a beginning course in information assurance which examines the fundamentals of information assurance. The course will introduce topics such as the need for security, risk management, security technology, cryptography, and physical security. Also covered are legal/ethical issues and security policies.

    Prerequisite(s): INFS 1010  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 2190 CIT Capstone

    1 Credit Hour(s)
    This capstone course can be either a field experience such as an internship, or a project-based course.

    Prerequisite(s): Advisor and/or Department Chair Approval.
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 2199 CITC CO-OP/Internship

    1 Credit Hour(s)
    Internships are intended as work experience for CITC students. Internships provide students with the opportunity to gain experience in workplace settings and to translate classroom learning into practice.

    Prerequisite(s): Advisor or Dept. Chair Approval
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 2290 CITC Capstone

    2 Credit Hour(s)
    This capstone course can be either a field experience such as an internship, or a project-based course. The description will vary among institutions.

    Prerequisite(s): Advisor and/or Department Chair Approval
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 2299 CIT CO-OP/Internship

    2 Credit Hour(s)
    Internships are intended as a work experience for CITC students. Internships provide students with the opportunity to gain experience in workplace settings and to translate classroom learning into practice.

    Prerequisite(s): Advisor or Department Chair Approval
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 2311 .Net Windows -Based Client Dev

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    An introduction on how to develop Windows-Based applications using the Microsoft.NET Framework using C#. Topics include creating the user interface, intergrating data, reports, implementing asynchronous programming techniques, and Windows Forms controls.

    Prerequisite(s): CITC 1301  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 2312 .NET Web-Based Client Dev

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is an introduction on how to develop Web-Based application using Microsoft .NET, ASP, and C#. Topics include creating Web applications using Web server controls, event handlers, application state, creating custom Web Server controls, and intergrating Web applications with back-end databases.

    Prerequisite(s): CITC 2311  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 2320 Windows Server I

    3 Credit Hour(s)


    Using the Microsoft Windows Server network operating system, students learn to install, configure, administer, maintain, and troubleshoot networked computer system servers. Prepares the student for the first MCSA Windows Server Certification Exam.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    • Install, configure, and administer the Windows Server network operating system.
    • Install and configure various networking components and services using the Windows Server network operating system, including users and groups.


    Prerequisite(s): CITC 1330  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.

  
  • CITC 2321 CCNA III

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    Scaling Networks is the third of four courses leading to the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) designation. This course focuses on Hierarchical Network Design, LAN Redundancy, Spanning Tree Protocol (STP), FHRP & HSRP redundancy protocols, Link redundancy with EtherChannel, Wireless LANs, Advanced Single-Area OSPF, Multi-Area OSPF, Cisco’s dynamic routing protocol EIGRP, IOS Images and Licensing. Students will be required to apply information from both CCNA I and CCNA II to network situations.

    Prerequisite(s): CITC 1324  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 2322 CCNA IV

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    Connecting Networks is the last of four courses leading to the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) designation. This course focuses on Hierarchical Network Design, WAN Technologies/Terminology/Devices, Point-to_Point Protocol (PPP), Frame Relay, Network Address Translation (NAT), Broadband solutions, Securing Site-to-Site connections with VPN/GRE/IPSec, and Network Management including NTP, SYSLOG, SNMO, and NetFlow. Students will be required to apply information from CCNA I, II, and III to network situations.

    Prerequisite(s): CITC 2321  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 2323 Windows Server II

    3 Credit Hour(s)


    This course builds upon the basic skills required to install, configure, support, and troubleshoot the various Microsoft Windows Server networking components and services, including DNS, DHCP, and other services found in the server network operating system. Also, this course prepares students for the second  MCSA Microsoft Server Certification Exam.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    • Server Image Deployment and Management
    • Server Monitoring 
    • Distributed File System (DFS) Configuration
    • DNS Zones Configuration
    • Domain Controllers Configuration
    • Active Directory (AD) Management 
    • Group Policy (GP) Settings and Processing Configuration  
    • Group Policy Object Management


    Prerequisite(s): CITC 2320  
    Using the Microsoft Windows Server network operating system, students learn to install, configure, administer, maintain, and troubleshoot networked computer system servers. Prepares the student for the first MCSA Windows Server Certification Exam.

  
  • CITC 2326 Network Security

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is designed to give students a fundamental understanding of computer and network security. It will introduce students to a wide variety of concepts related to network security. This course will cover the objectives for the current CompTIASecurity+ Certification.

    Prerequisite(s): CITC 1323  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 2331 UNIX/LINUX SysAdm

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course provides the foundation skills necessary to a system administrator. Topics include managing processes and network clients, planning file systems, managing users, managing network configurations, printing, backing up  files and systems, troubleshooting, performance tuning, security and installation procedures.

    Prerequisite(s): CITC 1332  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 2335 System Analysis

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course examines established and evolving methodologies for the analysis, design, and development of business information systems. Students practice software engineering principles and documentation techniques through case studies.

    Prerequisite(s): INFS 1010  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 2344 Database SQL

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is a comprehensive study of SQL using an industry established relational database management system such as Microsoft SQL Server or Oracle RDBMS. Topics will include database design, creation and management, advanced queries, stored procedures and functions, triggers, user defined functions, security awareness is an optimistic and pessimistic contingency DML data control, and performance tuning issues.

    Prerequisite(s): CITC 1301  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 2346 Oracle SQL

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is a continuation of the study of Microsoft SQL Server or Oracle relational database concepts and the SQL and Transact-SQL or PL/SQL programming language. Topics include relational database architecture, database design techniques, simple and complex query skills, creating views, creating views, creating and tuning indexes, building transactions and triggers, creating stored procedures, functions, triggers, and cursors.

    Prerequisite(s): CITC 2344  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 2351 CCNA Security

    3 Credit Hour(s)


    The Cisco Networking Academy CCNA Security course provides a next step for individuals who want to enhance their CCNA-level skill set and help meet the growing demand for network security professionals. The curriculum provides an introduction to the core security concepts and skills needed for the installation, troubleshooting, and monitoring of network devices to maintain the integrity, confidentiality, and availability of data and devices.

    Learning Outcomes:

    • demonstrate an understanding of network security principles as well as the tools and configurations available
    • demonstrate the skills needed to design, implement, and support network security
    • utilize critical thinking and complex problem-solving skills to solve security problems


    Prerequisite(s): CITC 1323 CITC 1324  or current CCNA certification
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.

  
  • CITC 2352 Digital Forensics

    3 Credit Hour(s)


    This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of computer forensics and investigations. This course will introduce students to computing investigations by preparing them to acquire, examine and summarize digital evidence.

    Learning Outcomes:

    • understand computer investigations, data acquisition and the process of crime and incident scenes
    • use current computer forensics tools and preform computer forensics analysis and validation
    • perform network forensics, e-mail investigations and cell phone and mobile device forensics
    • complete report for investigations


    Prerequisite(s): CITC 1351  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.

  
  • CITC 2353 Tactical Perimeter Defense

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    An examination of how software and hardware can be used to provide a perimeter of defense in protecting resources, and how security is addressed in both wireless and wired networks. Topics include the use of tools such as wireless access points, proxy servers, VPNs, auditing, intrusion detection systems and firewalls.

    Prerequisite(s): CITC 1351  Principles of Information Assurance
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 2355 Network Attacks

    3 Credit Hour(s)


    Encompasses in-depth exploration of various methods for attacking and defending a network. Explores network security concepts from the viewpoint of hackers and their attack methodologies. Includes topics about hackers, attacks, Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS) malicious code, computer crime and industrial espionage.

    Learning Outcomes:

    • explain the professional hacker’s methodology for attacking a network
    • explain the script kiddie’s methodology for attacking network
    • explain network security vulnerabilities
    • explain hackers, hacker techniques, tools and methodologies
    • describe hacker motivation


    Prerequisite(s): CITC 2326  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.

  
  • CITC 2356 Penetration Testing and Network Defense

    3 Credit Hour(s)


    This course focuses on how hackers attack computers and networks, and how to protect Windows and Linux systems. Legal restrictions and ethical guidelines will be taught and enforced. Students will perform many hands-on labs, both attacking and defending, using port scans, foot-printing, buffer overflow exploits, SQL injection, privilege escalation, Trojans, and backdoors. Students learn the legal, ethical, and technical aspects of using computer systems in unexpected ways. These skills are essential for penetration testers and other network security professionals.

    Learning Outcomes:

    • Explain what an ethical hacker can and cannot do legally, and explain the credentials and roles of penetration testers.
    • Define the types of malicious software found in modern networks.
    • Explain the threats and countermeasures for physical security and social engineering.
    • Use a variety of tools and techniques to perform foot-printing to learn about a company and its network.
    • Perform enumeration on various targets.
    • Perform simple scripting and coding tasks, specifically oriented towards the needs of network security professionals.
    • Identify vulnerabilities on various operating systems.
    • Describe how to take control of Web Servers, and how to protect them.
    • Locate and define weaknesses in various wireless networks, and protect them.
    • Explain how cryptography and hashing work, and perform attacks against them such as password cracking and man-in-the-middle attacks, using various tools.


    Prerequisite(s): CITC 1302  
    Corequisite(s): CITC 2326  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.

  
  • CITC 2364 Virtual Essentials

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is designated to give students a fundamental understanding of computer and network security. It will introduce students to a wide variety of concepts related to network security. This course will cover the objectives for the current CompTIA+ Certification.

    Prerequisite(s): CITC 2331  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 2366 Cloud Essentials

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is an introduction into the cloud computing model of servers, networks, applications and other elements related to data centers and how this data is made available to IT and end users via the internet. Students will be prepared to take the CompTIA Cloud Essentials (CLO-001) specialty certification exam.

    This course builds upon the basic skills required to install, configure, support, and troubleshoot the various Microsoft Windows Server networking components and services, including DNS, DHCP, and other services found in the server network operating system. Also, this course prepares students for the second MCSA Microsoft Server Certification Exam.
  
  • CITC 2390 CIT Capstone

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    The capstone course can be either a field experience such as an internship, or a project-based course. Students interested in Internships must secure an IT- related internship and obtain approval from advisor/instructor prior to the first day of class. Students not participating in internships will complete project tasks, utilizing knowledge and skills acquired in previous CITC courses to build a completed project within their chosen concentration.

    Prerequisite(s): Faculty Advisor or Department Chair Approval
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 2391 Special Topics in CIT

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    Special topics relating to various aspects of computer information technology. The course may be repeated for credit with departmental permission.

    Prerequisite(s): Advisor and Departmental Chair Approval
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 2399 CITC CO-OP/Internship

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    Internships are intended as a work experience for CITC students. Internships provide students with the opportunity to gain experience in workplace settings and to translate classroom learning into practice.

    Prerequisite(s): Advisor or Department Chair Approval
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 2499 CITC CO-OP/Internship

    4 Credit Hour(s)
    Internships are intended as a work experience for CITC students. Internships provide students with the opportunity to gain experience in workplace settings and to translate classroom learning into practice.

    Prerequisite(s): Advisor or Department Chair Approval
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.

Computer Science

  
  • CISP 1010 Computer Science I

    4 Credit Hour(s)
    This course will present an introduction to programming and problem-solving techniques using a high-level object-oriented programming environment. Topics will include data types, assignments, decisions, loops, functions, IO techniques, arrays, strings, and data abstractions. Emphasis will be on stepwise refinement of computer algorithms and the coding, debugging, and executing of programs. Keyboarding skills are required by the student to work in a timely fashion.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 0100  or MATH 0410  or MATH 0530  or MATH 0630  or equivalent and READ 0810  or equivalent and ENGL 0810  or equivalent.
  
  • CISP 1020 Computer Science II

    4 Credit Hour(s)
    The course provides a continuation of advanced concepts and skills that were introduced in   . Attention will be directed to object oriented programming techniques including best practices within software engineering. Emphasis will be placed on enhancing programming logic skills, effective interface design for applications in an event-driven environment, and use of advanced data structures including Lists, Stacks, Queues, Linked Lists, Trees and recursions concepts.

    Prerequisite(s):   
  
  • CITC 1313 .NET Programming

    3 Credit Hour(s)


    • This course introduces Microsoft Visual Basic.

      Topics to be covered include:

      • object-oriented programming
      • interface design
      • controls
      • decisions
      • creating menus and dialog boxes
      • looping
      • arrays
      • accessing database files
    •  


    Prerequisite(s): CISP 1010   or CITC 1301  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.


Computer Science: TN eCampus

  
  • CIS 113 Programming in Visual Basic

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    An introduction to Microsoft Visual Basic. Topics to be covered include: Object-Oriented Programming, interface design, controls, decisions, creating menus and dialog boxes, writing event and general procedures, and using operating system services.

    Prerequisite(s): Student must have completed a basic computer literacy course (e.g., CIS100, BIT1150) or receive permission of instructor.
  
  • CIS 173 Programming in C#

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    An introduction to Microsoft C#. Topics to be covered include: Object- Oriented Programming, interface design, controls, decisions, creating menus and dialog boxes, looping, arrays and accessing database files.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 113  or permission of instructor.
  
  • CIS 186 Database Programming

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is designed to enable students to develop customized database applications. Subsequent to a brief survey of relational database techniques and methods, the emphasis will be on developing the necessary skills to design, create, and implement user-friendly front ends for relational databases. Using a database engine such as Microsoft Access 2003, the course will concentrate on developing and coding procedures using VBA (Visual Basic for Applications).

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 113 or the equivalent; the student will also need to be able to use the basic functions of Microsoft Access.
  
  • CIS 193 Introduction to LINUX

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is designed to prepare students for the COMPTIA LINUX+ Certification Exam. Linux is a relatively new open source system software that is becoming increasingly popular for use on business Web Servers, email servers, application servers, and even personal desktop systems. This course is designed to prepare students to take the certification exam; however, it is not a substitute for the certification exam. A basic foundation in computer hardware, networking concepts, as well as familiarity with desktop and server operating systems such as Windows 2000 or Unix would be helpful. Programming experience of any type would also be an asset but is not explicitly required.

    Prerequisite(s): BIT 1150 or equivalent introductory computer class, or permission from instructor.
  
  • CIS 263 Web Design

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course will cover the fundamental concepts of the Internet and World Wide Web, including how the Internet works, protocols and services, addressing and routing in the Internet. Students will design and create web pages using web page editing/publishing software and edit graphic images for web pages using image editing software. Use of simple Java applets will be covered and some basic Javascript scripts will be written for web pages if time permits.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 109, BIT 1150, or INFS 1010 .
  
  • CIS 2640 Web Page Applications

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is the study of various applications available for the support of web pages. Topics covered will include web page multimedia design using Adobe Creative Suite. The latest techniques of web page design technology will be emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 263 . Prior to taking this course, students should have a basic working knowledge of the Windows operating system, the Internet and Web editing/publishing software.
  
  • CISP 203 Data Structures

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course covers the basic fundamental principles of Data Structures. It uses C++ as a programming language to implement a variety of data structures. As such it requires the knowledge of programming in C++ offered in the online course CIS 1610 . Topics will include recursion, C++ STL containers, vectors, C++ pointers, dynamic memory, STL Stacks, STL Queues, and Lists with or without iterators. User Designed classes are implemented.

    Prerequisite(s): Prior to taking this course, students should have made a C or better in CIS 1610 .
  
  • CISP 209 Java Programming I

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course will cover the fundamental concepts of Object Oriented Programming using Java. Topics will include objects, classes, constructors, methods, instance variables. User Designed classes are implemented. Arrays and Array Processing are emphasized. Graphical User Interfaces are developed using Java. Applets are explained and implemented.

  
  • CISP 218 Java Programming II

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course continues the coverage of the fundamental concepts of Object Oriented Programming that started in Java Programming I. Topics will include Super Classes, Sub Classes, Polymorphism, Inheritance, Stacks, Queues, and Lists. User Designed classes are implemented.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CST 209-W01 with a grade of “C” or better, or permission of instructor.
  
  • CITC 1312 Introduction to .Net Programming

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is a study of object-oriented programming through the use and practical application of the C# language. Topics include classes, objects, methods, GUI programming, graphics, databases, XML, Web pages and Internet.

    Prerequisite(s): CITC 1301   or CITC 1310  or CISP 1010  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 1318 Data Structures

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course covers the basic fundamental principles of data structures. It uses a programming language to implement a variety of data structures. Topics will include recursion, containers, vectors, pointers, dynamic memory, stacks, queues, and Lists with or without iterators. User Designed classes are implemented.

    Prerequisite(s): “C” or better in CISP 1010  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 1319 Intro to Programming for Mobile Apps

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    An introduction to mobile computer programming. Students will learn the foundation of computer programming while designing, developing and deploying mobile applications that incorporate multimedia, GPS and other current technologies.

    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 1333 Linux LPIC-1

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course prepare the student to complete the LPIC-1 Junior Level Linux Certification exams 101 and 102. Topics will include Linux command line operation, maintenance tasks within Linux, and installation, configuration, and connectivity of Linux workstations.

    Prerequisite(s): INFS 1010  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CITC 1360 Computer Graphics and Animation

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    The objective of this course is to help the student develop some facility in the use of graphics editing software and graphics creation software. The course will cover the basic concepts in image development and graphics manipulation.

    Prerequisite(s): INFS 1010  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.

Court Reporting

  
  • CORT 1001 Legal Terminology

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is designed to familiarize the student with the meaning and spelling of Latin and English legal terms that legal professionals encounter.

    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CORT 1010 Machine Shorthand Theory I and Lab

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course covers the introduction and mastery of basic stenotype concepts for all one-syllable words and simple two-syllable words written by sound, beginning number writing, all marks of punctuation, one- and two-letter brief forms, two- and three-letter phrases, reading from stenotype notes, and dictation at 40 words per minute. Students begin the development of recording and transcribing live dictation with the use of computer-aided transcription (real-time translation). Mastery of the beginning principles of the touch method are emphasized as well as an understanding of the court reporting profession.

    Prerequisite(s): Student must obtain machine and other equipment (paper, cassette recorder and cassette tapes) to be prepared to work on first night of class.
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CORT 1020 Machine Shorthand Theory II and Lab

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course covers the introduction and mastery of advanced stenotype concepts for word beginnings and word endings (words of two or more syllables), advanced number concepts, homonyms, reading from stenotype notes, dictation at 40/60 words per minute, and introduction to beginning speed building principles.

    Prerequisite(s): CORT 1001 , CORT 1010  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CORT 1025 Introduction to Speedbuilding

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is an initial course for machine shorthand students in building speed in the taking of dictation at speeds of 40-60 wpm through live, online or electronic media. Dictation will consist of two-voice testimony, literary and current events. This course will focus on vocabulary usage and development, theory reinforcement and an introduction to briefs and phrases found in legal and literary dictation. The student will also receive instruction on using a computer-aided (real-time) translation system for transcription. Students will be able to take dictation at 60 wpm, transcribe with 95 percent accuracy, by the end of term.

    Prerequisite(s): CORT 1010  
    Corequisite(s): CORT 1020  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CORT 1110 Court Reporting Applications

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course encompasses forms and formats for different reporting situations; reporting interrogatories, statements, depositions, court proceedings; set up of court reporter’s office and records kept for both official and freelance reporting; developing a reference library; writing legal cites; forms of address; handling read backs; handling exhibits; testifying from past proceedings; finding employment; certification requirements, ethical considerations; transcribing notary depositions, hearings, motions, pretrial hearing, coroner inquests, trials, petitions, conventions, and meetings.

    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CORT 1210 CR Grammar and Punctuation

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course contains specialized English topics as they apply to the reporting profession. Grammar for court reporters emphasizes parts of speech and parts of structure of sentences. This course lays an essential foundation for study of the sophisticated punctuation rules that follow, which enable the reporter to produce verbatim transcripts with emphasis on proofreading techniques.

    Corequisite(s): CORT 1020 , ENGL 1010  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CORT 2010 Speedbuilding I

    4 Credit Hour(s)
    This course teaches speed and accuracy in the transcription of machine shorthand for speeds ranging from 60-180 wpm in the areas of Two-Voice Testimony (Q&A), Jury Charge (Legal Opinion) and Literacy. Computer-aided transcription systems, word processing and video applications for the court reporter are also covered in this course. Graduation from this concentration requires a “B” or better in this course.

    Prerequisite(s): CORT 1025  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CORT 2015 Computer-Aided Transcription

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    Computer-aided transcription systems, word processing systems, and video application for the court reporter are covered in this course.

    Corequisite(s): CORT 2010  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CORT 2022 Speedbuilding II

    4 Credit Hour(s)
    Dictation practice and testing for speeds 140-180 words per minute are included in this course. The student must pass progressive tests of Q & A, Jury Charge (Legal Opinion) and Literary up to 180 words per minute with 95 percent accuracy (five-minute tests). Computer-aided transcription systems, multi-voice dictation and transcript productions are also covered in this course. Graduation from this concentration requires a “B” or better in this course.

    Prerequisite(s): CORT 1025  
    Corequisite(s): CORT 2015  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CORT 2032 Speedbuilding III

    4 Credit Hour(s)
    This course includes dictation practice and testing for speeds 100 to 180 words per minute. The student must pass progressive tests of Q & A, Jury Charge (Legal Opinion) and Literary up to 180 words per minute with 95 percent accuracy (all five-minute tests). Computer-aided transcription systems, real-time applications, dictionary building and transcript production are also covered in this course. Graduation from this concentration requires a “B” or better in this course.

    Prerequisite(s): CORT 1025 , CORT 2015  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CORT 2040 Speedbuilding IV

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This is the final speedbuilding course in this series and consists of dictation practice and testing for speeds 200 to 225 words per minute. The student must pass three tests of Q&A at 225 words per minute and Jury Charge (Legal Opinion) at 200 words per minute with 95 percent accuracy (five-minute tests). Added emphasis will be placed on formatting and style, as well as transcript production. The course will also include a mock RPR (Registered Professional Reporter) exam.

    Prerequisite(s): CORT 2032 , CORT 2015 . Graduation from this concentration requires a “B” or better in this course.
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CORT 2070 Court Report Internship

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    The student practices the skills needed to be a court reporter (freelance official, closed-captioned, conference). More than 60 clock hours of practical experience, on an individual basis, in the courtroom or in a deposition situation under the supervision of a working court reporter are required. From this actual experience, the student submits an acceptable 50-page transcript. This internship commences after the student is writing 200 words per minute.

    Prerequisite(s): CORT 2022  CORT 1210 , LEGL 2030  
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CORT 2080 Special Topics in Real-time Reporting

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is an in-depth study of selected topics in the fields of court reporting, closed captioning and CART reporting designed to reinforce basic knowledge and to further professional competencies.

    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.

Criminal Justice Studies

  
  • CRMJ 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    this course objective is for a student to examine policing, corrections, and the American court system, amongst other topics. The student gains an understanding of the complexity of the criminal justice processes, its lack of central coordination and most significantly, how justice is administered in the American society.

  
  • CRMJ 1020 Introduction to the Legal Process

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course reviews basic laws governing the maintenance of a democratic society and how criminal and constitutional laws meet the challenge of American society.

  
  • CRMJ 1300 American Legal System

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course reviews basic laws governing the maintenance of a democratic society and how criminal, constitutional, consumer, environmental, housing and family laws meet the challenge of American society.

  
  • CRMJ 1301 Correctional Counseling

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course introduces students to the role of the correctional counselor. It defines the goals and methods, as well as the theories associated with institutional counseling. It also exposes students to the different issues associated with different offender typologies.

  
  • CRMJ 1311 Criminal Law

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course examines the emergence of criminal law, criminal penalties and how law is used to regulate human behavior. The study of substantive law, which defines the elements, rights and responsibilities of law, will constitute the primary learning focus.

  
  • CRMJ 1322 Police Administration and Organization

    3 Credit Hour(s)

    This course is a study of the principles of personnel management functions and organization of the police agency.

    Topics studied in the course include:

    • policy procedures
    • evaluation of the research
    • planning
    • development processes
    • operational duties
    • commands


    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CRMJ 1325 Issues and Ethics in Criminal Justice

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is a review and in-depth examination of current issues, trends, and ethical consideration concerning the criminal justice process with emphasis on problems impacting local criminal justice agencies and personnel.

  
  • CRMJ 1330 Criminal Evidence and Procedures

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course will be an introduction to the American Criminal Justice System with an emphasis on handling evidence and suspects, the US Constitution, individual rights, criminal court procedures, the Exclusionary Rule, probable cause, arrest procedures, search warrants, stop and frisks, admissions, interrogations, and confessions, and the legal requirements to be followed in processing criminal evidence and defendants.

  
  • CRMJ 1340 Criminal Investigations

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is an examination of the methods of interviews, interrogation, admissions, confessions, written statements, criminal case report writing, and evidence evaluation used in criminal investigations.

  
  • CRMJ 1355 Understanding Terrorism

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course will introduce students to the study of terrorism, and will provide a basic knowledge of the history and politics of terrorism as well as explore contemporary terrorism events. The course will review major theories and organizations in the field of domestic and international terrorism.

  
  • CRMJ 1373 Introduction to Homeland Security

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course will introduce students to the vocabulary and important components of Homeland Security. We will discuss the importance of the agencies associated with Homeland Security and their interrelated duties and relationships. We will examine historical events that impact Homeland Security. We will explore state, national, and international laws impacting Homeland Security. We will examine the most critical threats confronting Homeland Security.

    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CRMJ 1374 Transportation and Border Security

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course provides an overview of modern border and transportation security challenges, as well as different methods employed to address these challenges. The course covers a time period from post 9/11 to the present. The course explores topics associated with border security and security for transportation infrastructure, to include: seaports, ships, aircraft, airports, trains, train stations, trucks, highways, bridges,rail lines, pipelines, and buses. The course will include an exploration of technological solutions employed to enhance security of borders and transportation systems. Students will be required to discuss the legal, economic, political, and cultural concerns and impacts associated with transportation and border security. The course provides students with a knowledge level understanding of the variety of challenges inherent in transportation and border security.

    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CRMJ 2010 Introduction to Law Enforcement

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    An overview of the American Police, including the philosophy and historical and historical evolution behind the police force. Emphasis is on policing procedures; crime prevention and control; functions of law enforcement; problems and needs facing the police; and contemporary issues.

  
  • CRMJ 2020 Introduction to Corrections

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    An overview of corrections, including the philosophy and historical evolution behind the development of corrections. Emphasis is on corrections procedures, current prison conditions and operations, problems and needs facing corrections, and related contemporary issues.

  
  • CRMJ 2311 Juvenile Justice

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is an overview of the extent, causes, nature, and control of juvenile delinquency from a sociological perspective. Various theories of delinquency causation, the role of social institutions, the major components of the juvenile justice system and traditional juvenile corrections will be presented.

  
  • CRMJ 2312 Criminology

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is a systematic study of crime, criminals and the criminal justice system. It explores the fundamental elements of criminology through a study of the causation and criminal behavior theories and examines the relevant activities of the criminal justice system.

    Prerequisite(s): CRMJ 1010
  
  • CRMJ 2332 Drug Identification and Effects

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    A study of the fundamentals needed for identifying both the appearance and effects of controlled substances. Students receive guides to controlled substances; their color, trade names and drug codes. Topics include a critical examination of the physiological, sociological and legal aspects of drug abuse and the many complexities which have developed as a direct or indirect result of drug abuse in society.

  
  • CRMJ 2335 Victimology

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course provides a combination of victimization theories with applied responses to victimization. It explores victim-offender relationships, provides data, and investigates situational factors and responses to victims. The student learns to identify some precursors of violence as stalking and harassment. The effects of violence are studied.

  
  • CRMJ 2340 Investigative Report Writing

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course focuses on preparing analytical investigative reports and explores techniques of organizing structuring, and investigating the report to comply with proper guidelines.

  
  • CRMJ 2345 Domestic Violence

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    A study of violence, focusing on physical, sexual, and emotional abuse in the family society.

  
  • CRMJ 2359 Correctional Administration

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course provides context of corrections history to goals and philosophies of correctional management. The course uses contemporary theory, research and practice. It examines offender classifications, programs and services, the institutional environment, and the functions and management of correctional staff.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 0810   and READ 0810  or equivalent.
    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CRMJ 2365 Constitutional Rights of Prisoners

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is an analysis of prisoners’ rights in light of new Supreme Court decisions. An explanation of proper procedures recently developed to comply with these decisions for the protection of the agency and the individual correctional officers is discussed.
     

  
  • CRMJ 2367 Mental Health Aspects of Criminal Behavior

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is a study of deviant behavior with emphasis on dealing with the mentally disturbed, sexual deviates, and drug addicts. It examines the role of the psychologist in criminal justice cases.

  
  • CRMJ 2371 Intelligence Analysis and Security Management

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course examines intelligence analysis and its indispensable relationship to the security management of terrorist attacks, man-made disasters and natural disasters. It also explores vulnerabilities of our national defense and private sectors, as well as the threats posed to these institutions by terrorists, man-made disasters, and natural disasters. Students will discuss substantive issues regarding intelligence support of the homeland security measures implemented by the United States and explore how the intelligence community operates.

    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CRMJ 2381 Special Topics in Criminal Justice

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course provides an in-depth study of significant, relevant, and timely trends and issues in the field of Criminial Justice.

    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CRMJ 2390 Probation and Parole

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course is a study of the supervision of offenders in the community, including history, philosophy, legal foundations, strategies, professional roles and contemporary models, programs and services.

    This course is not designed for transfer to four-year universities. Students should check course recommendations with the college or university to which they intend to transfer for a baccalaureate degree. The receiving institution always makes the final decision about transferability of credits.
  
  • CRMJ 2394 White Collar Crime

    3 Credit Hour(s)
    This course provides an introduction to white-collar crime and examines the various tupes of white-collar crimes that exist in society with and emphasis on causes, frequency, control, and social impact.

 

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